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All About Cancer

All About Cancer


Skin Cancer Myths versus Facts

Myth: Eighty percent of a person’s lifetime sun exposure is acquired before age 18, so if I’m older, it doesn’t matter how much sun I get.

Reality: Actually, only about 23 percent of lifetime exposure occurs by age 18. You can add – and should – help prevent sun damage at every age by taking precautionary measures

 

Myth: Tanning at a salon is safer than tanning outdoors – it’s a controlled dose of UV radiation.

Reality: When compared to people have never tanned indoors; indoor tanners have a higher risk of all forms of skin cancer. A controlled dose of tanning lamp radiation is a high dose: Frequent tanners using new high-pressure sunlamps may receive as much as 12 times the annual ultraviolet A(UVA) dose they receive from sun exposure.

 

Myth: Some ingredients in sunscreen can cause cancer.

Reality: Current research shows that when used as directed, sunscreens are safe and effective. The Skin Cancer Foundation has always recommended using a sunscreen with an SPF or higher as one important part of a complete sun protection program.

 

Myth: The sun is the best way to get vitamin D

Reality: Our bodies can produce vitamin D following exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. However, after a limited amount of sun exposure, vitamin D production reaches its maximum. Further UV exposure will actually break down vitamin D to inactive compounds! Furthermore, sun exposure increases your risk of skin cancer and accelerated skin aging.

 

Myth: People of color don’t get skin cancer.

Reality: People of color are less likely to develop skin cancer than Caucasians, but they have a higher risk of dying from it. A very dangerous and fast-spreading skin cancer known as acral lentiginous melanoma is more common among darker-skinned people and may appear as a suspicious growth in the mucous membranes, under the nails, or on the palms or soles of the feet. Whatever your skin color, protect yourself, perform regular skin self-exams, and obtain a professional full-body skin exam every year.

 

Myth: Eighty percent of a person’s lifetime sun exposure is acquired before age 18, so if I’m older, it doesn’t matter how much sun I get.

Reality: Actually, only about 23 percent of lifetime exposure occurs by age 18. You can add – and should – help prevent sun damage at every age by taking precautionary measures

 

Myth: Tanning at a salon is safer than tanning outdoors – it’s a controlled dose of UV radiation.

Reality: When compared to people have never tanned indoors; indoor tanners have a higher risk of all forms of skin cancer. A controlled dose of tanning lamp radiation is a high dose: Frequent tanners using new high-pressure sunlamps may receive as much as 12 times the annual ultraviolet A(UVA) dose they receive from sun exposure.

 

Myth: Some ingredients in sunscreen can cause cancer.

Reality: Current research shows that when used as directed, sunscreens are safe and effective. The Skin Cancer Foundation has always recommended using a sunscreen with an SPF or higher as one important part of a complete sun protection program.

 

Myth: The sun is the best way to get vitamin D

Reality: Our bodies can produce vitamin D following exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. However, after a limited amount of sun exposure, vitamin D production reaches its maximum. Further UV exposure will actually break down vitamin D to inactive compounds! Furthermore, sun exposure increases your risk of skin cancer and accelerated skin aging.

 

Myth: People of color don’t get skin cancer.

Reality: People of color are less likely to develop skin cancer than Caucasians, but they have a higher risk of dying from it. A very dangerous and fast-spreading skin cancer known as acral lentiginous melanoma is more common among darker-skinned people and may appear as a suspicious growth in the mucous membranes, under the nails, or on the palms or soles of the feet. Whatever your skin color, protect yourself, perform regular skin self-exams, and obtain a professional full-body skin exam every year.


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